A Word About Haste

THE IDES OF MAY 2020

Aloha;

When I was working on the blog posting for 01May2020; we were confronted (and confounded) by several business disruptions.  These obstacles force our company to reassess our strategy going forward.  Ironically, we have acted with some of the very haste our post addresses.  We have decided to use this roadblock as an opportunity to repair flaws, address oversights, and expand our horizons.  This will likely alter the format of our site; but the database will remain accessible for the present.

Below you will find the 01May2020 Post.   We will present more updates soon.

Respectfully Yours,

J. A. Stubbs, Editor-In-Chief

Forgotten Lore Publishing, llc

 

 

 

A WORD ABOUT HASTE

This post was originally intended for 01May2020

Aloha;

Happy May Day!

We use the concept of time as a commodity in our society.  Since we trade access to our time, effort, and attention; in exchange for things we need.  Yet we also use time as a form of currency.  When we barter promises of allocated time and work production for different promises of resources and allocated time.  Beyond that, we use our understanding of time as a working tool to get things done.  With our efforts to direct the events that occur over its’ course.

So the way we judge time gives it a real, though transitory, value.  The same value we place in currencies. Or gems and precious metals.   Just as we may hoard promises of time commitment, the way we store other goods.  And since we want the benefit we gain from the way we use time; it has become a popular way to do things.  The proof of this is that we strive to squeeze all we can from each minute.  We have even worked out ways to buy and sell events that have not happened yet.

This outlook helps drive our need to produce results.  For it spurs us to vie for access to resources that others need.  Those who can direct the use of their time as they like, have a freedom many others don’t.  Which can give them benefits, or access to resources, which are not readily evident.  Because they have the time to find them.  So some people gain advantage beyond their peers, since they may choose when they will do what they want to do.

While those of us whose working hours are committed, can not benefit from sudden opportunities as easily.  Yet our desire to match the successes that people who control over their own time have, is intense.  Thus we spend much of our effort trying to compete with people who have resources and freedoms we lack.  As we seek to match their level of successful control over what happens in our lives.  And enjoy the same degree of free expression.

However, many of us never reach the level of control over our world we might like.  Even if we spend our lives in an attempt to gain that control.  Thus those of us who don’t have the same latitude to structure our time and effort; are at a disadvantage to those who can.  Since they have options that most of us will never see.  And a lot of people will envy them, as they are free to choose how their time is spent.

Such disparity foments competition and innovation; as people work to gain more control over their time, and its use.  As well as better management of their own lives.  Which means those who don’t have these advantages can feel under pressure to ‘keep up’ with the “advantaged”.  So when we don’t take the time to chart a blue-print for success; haste for results can hurt us.  If we let our rush to keep pace with an arbitrary model of performance influence our decisions.  It can cause us to rely on incomplete information and hunches.

Which means we risk our resources, time included; as we work toward our goals.  If we take too long to make decisions, opportunities may be lost.  But should we commit our resources too quickly, the results may be far worse.  For when an opportunity is mishandled or squandered; our resources lost as well.  Which makes us worse off than we started; in spite of all of our effort.  Yet the pressure to compete, to match your peers, to succeed, is a constant drive; and is hard to quell.

There is a chance this drive will make us impulsive or rash.  So we must stay on guard against acting in haste.  This is especially true when lives are at stake.  As they are now; in the face of an uncontrolled contagion.  This is a time, and an opportunity, to prove that we are the “sapiens” we claim to be.  To act together in our own collective best interest.  And arrest this threat to humanity before it can kill millions and cripple our world.

Yet we must remember to act promptly; but not in blindly.  Resources are more critical than ever; and should not be squandered because we used unverified facts.  Or wasted because we relied on flawed data.  Mistakes like that will cost many lives and lead to a great deal of suffering.  Which is something we are sure no one wants.  As a child I was told “Act In Haste And Repent At Leisure”.  Since we don’t want to have to repent (at leisure, or otherwise), I suggest that we do not acting in haste.

Respectfully Yours,

J. A. Stubbs, Editor-In-Chief

Forgotten Lore Publishing, llc

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